4th of July Lobster Boil - 12

I know, I know. I’m the Grillin’ Fool, not the Boil­in’ Fool. And that 4th of July is for cel­e­brat­ing the birth of Amer­i­ca by cook­ing ger­man sausages, light­ing off Chi­ne­se fire­works, and drink­ing Ger­man sound­ing beers. Truth is, we cel­e­brate the 4th, gen­er­al­ly by cook­ing out. A cook­out doesn’t have to be with a grill or a smok­er. It could be with a dutch oven next to a camp­fire or it could be a pot of sausages, pota­toes, corn, gar­lic, shrimp, spices and some FAT lob­ster tails!

4th of July Lobster Boil

This recipe might sound famil­iar as I used our Craw­fish Boil recipe as a basis for this one. The big dif­fer­ence is lob­sters instead of craw­fish which meant the tim­ing is dif­fer­ent. Oh, and we for­got the onions.

Ingre­di­ents:

2 bags crab boil
2 oz con­cen­trat­ed liq­uid crab boil
1/4 cup cayen­ne
1/2 cup salt
1/2 cup hot sauce
10 lemons, halved
5 lbs small pota­toes, cut into equal sized pieces
8 ears gar­lic
42 oz smoked pol­ish sausage
40 oz smoked andouille
12 jum­bo lob­ster tails from 2 lb lob­sters from Lob​ster​Any​where​.com
2 lbs U8-12 shrimp
2 lbs brus­sel sprouts — option­al
1 whole onion, sliced and divid­ed — option­al (because we for­got it)
3 pack­ages of frozen corn (a total of 12 ears cut into thirds or halves) – divid­ed

***The­se ingre­di­ents will be enough for two full lob­ster pots, so cut in half if a small­er crowd. I fed a dozen adults and lots of kids who real­ly only want­ed the corn, pota­toes and sausage.

Some are going to say that on the 4th of July we should use fresh corn. Well, part of the rea­son to use frozen is to slow down the boil as to not over­cook the lob­ster tails.

Before we start, I high­ly rec­om­mend cov­er­ing an 8 foot table with a dis­pos­able plas­tic table cloth and then a few lay­ers of news­pa­per. This is going to move faster than most think, so this is very impor­tant. The last thing any­one wants is the lob­sters to be ready to eat and hav­ing to wait for some­one to find the table cloth and start spread­ing news­pa­per.

Start by fill­ing your lob­ster pot (which is a Turkey Fry­er filled with water rather than oil) with enough water so every­thing can be sub­merged but not too much that the water will pour over the sides when every­thing is dropped in the pot. How much exact­ly? That depends in the size of the pot and how much you are cook­ing at one time. It’s some­thing you are going to have eye­ball and hope you get right. If you don’t have enough you can add more. If you have too much, pray nobody is wear­ing open toed shoes or is bare­foot near­by. Once the pot is full and over the propane heater, add the bags of crab boil, liq­uid crab boil, cayen­ne, salt, hot sauce (you can always add more hot sauce if you want more heat), and half the lemons. Crank up the heater. Now head over and prep the rest of the ingre­di­ents while the water comes to a boil.

Halve your gar­lic ears at the equa­tor:

4th of July Lobster Boil - 1

Don’t wor­ry about the papery skin. Just lop them in half to expose each clove, both top and bot­tom

Cut the pota­toes. We bought baby pota­toes, but if you buy whole ones, cut them down to small, equal­ly sized chunks.

Pile up all the rest of the ingre­di­ents because we will be doing this in stages. In this case, we were able to do this all in two pots:

4th of July Lobster Boil - 14

Don’t for­get the star of the show:

4th of July Lobster Boil - 19

The num­ber of lob­ster tails depends on how many peo­ple are com­ing. We actu­al­ly added a 13th tail to the sec­ond pot.

I would be remiss if I didn’t stop right here and talk about lob­ster. There are a lot of you that are assum­ing this is some­thing they can nev­er do. That you don’t live in the North­east and will nev­er be able to do a lob­ster boil. You may be assum­ing that I live on the coast or paid through the nose for some lob­ster tails. I live in St. Louis and the lob­sters were extreme­ly rea­son­able. That’s right, I did a Lob­ster boil in a city about as far away from an ocean as it gets in the Unit­ed States. How did I pull it off? Because I ordered the lob­ster tails (and the mon­ster shrimp) from Lob​ster​Any​where​.com. They lived up to their name by get­ting me the­se ter­ri­fic tails (and shrimp) to cel­e­brate the birth of my coun­try. First and fore­most, the qual­i­ty is top notch. I got noth­ing but raves. Sec­ond, the prices are cheap and their ship­ping rates are too. Third, the cus­tomer ser­vice is top notch. We’ve already decid­ed to do New Year’s Eve with them as well. You can also order live lob­sters, oth­er seafood as well as steaks, bisque and soup. Now back to the recipe.

The­se are option­al:

4th of July Lobster Boil - 18

Once the water in the pot is at a rolling boil, toss in half the sausage, gar­lic, and pota­toes, hold­ing back the lob­ster, shrimp, corn and Brus­sel sprouts. Close the lid.

After 15 min­utes, the water is an amaz­ing broth of fla­vors from the sausage, sea­son­ing, hot sauce and gar­lic. Not to men­tion the pota­toes are soak­ing all that up. Now add the lob­ster tails:

4th of July Lobster Boil - 2

Close the lid and wait five min­utes.

If you

Now add half the shrimp and option­al Brus­sel sprouts and close the lid for 2 more min­utes

Then open the lid and add half the frozen corn and turn off the propane:

4th of July Lobster Boil - 3

Yes, I wrote to turn off the propane. Turn it off. The com­bi­na­tion of turn­ing off the propane and adding the frozen corn will great­ly slow down the heat of the water which will slow down the cook­ing of the lob­ster and shrimp. This is a good thing. Put the lid on and wait five more min­utes.

Lift the inner sieve pot out slow­ly and care­ful­ly. If you lift too quick­ly, the water can’t go out the holes fast enough stay safe in the pot. If you lift too fast, all you will have is an indus­tri­al sprin­kler pour­ing near boil­ing water all over your­self and any­one with­in 3 feet. Drain off all the water and and dump the sieve pot over the news­pa­per on the table (remem­ber that step?):

4th of July Lobster Boil - 8 4th of July Lobster Boil - 10 4th of July Lobster Boil - 11

Then ask each guest to grab a tail and what­ev­er oth­er ingre­di­ents they want:

4th of July Lobster Boil - 12

Usu­al­ly we divide the group by kids and peo­ple that don’t like spicy and those that like the heat. For the sec­ond pot, we add more hot sauce and spices, plus the oth­er half of the lemons, sausage, pota­toes, and gar­lic and close the lid and repeat the process for round 2:

4th of July Lobster Boil - 6 Pro Tips ~ Have a large, sharp knife handy to split the tails for your guests to make it eas­ier for them to eat. Be care­ful. The corn is addic­tive! I hear cau­li­flow­er is fan­tas­tic in lob­ster boils. When every­one has had their fill, sim­ply pull the four cor­ners of the table cloth and tie them off. The plas­tic table cloth just became a trash bag.

If you have any ques­tions or com­ments, feel free to leave them below or send me an email

Full dis­clo­sure. Lob​ster​Any​where​.com Com­pen­sat­ed me for this post. As you know, I won’t pro­mote any­thing I don’t absolute­ly believe in and I believe in Lob​ster​Any​where​.com. Their lob­ster tails and shrimp that I have sam­pled were top notch. I can’t wait for New Years and some live lob­sters! Scroll past the recipe card for a sweet info­graph­ic from them about cook­ing lob­sters includ­ing how to grill them.

4th of July Lob­ster Boil
Author: 
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Seafood
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Step by step instruc­tions on how to do a lob­ster boil for your next 4th of July.
Ingre­di­ents
  • 2 bags crab boil
  • 2 oz con­cen­trat­ed liq­uid crab boil
  • ¼ cup cayen­ne
  • ½ cup salt
  • ½ cup hot sauce
  • 10 lemons, halved
  • 5 lbs small pota­toes, cut into equal sized pieces
  • 8 ears gar­lic, halved
  • 42 oz smoked pol­ish sausage
  • 40 oz smoked andouille
  • 12 jum­bo lob­ster tails from 2 lb lob­sters from Lob​ster​Any​where​.com
  • 2 lbs U8-12 shrimp
  • 2 lbs brus­sel sprouts — option­al
  • 3 pack­ages of frozen corn (a total of 12 ears cut into thirds or halves) – divid­ed
Instruc­tions
  1. Cov­er an 8 foot table with a dis­pos­able plas­tic table cloth and then a few lay­ers of news­pa­per.
  2. Fill the lob­ster pot with water (but not too much, the rest of the ingre­di­ents have to go in too)
  3. Add the bags of crab boil, liq­uid crab boil, cayen­ne, salt, hot sauce, and half the lemons to the water and crank up the heat
  4. Slice the pota­toes to keep them a con­sis­tent size
  5. When the water is at a rolling boil, add half the sausage, pota­toes and gar­lic and close the lid
  6. After 15 min­utes, add the lob­ster tails and close the lid
  7. After 5 min­utes, add the shrimp and option­al Brus­sel sprouts and close the lid
  8. After 2 min­utes, add the corn, close the lid and turn off the propane
  9. After 5 min­utes, care­ful­ly remove the sieve pot and pour the lob­ster, shrimp, sausage, pota­toes, and corn on those news­pa­per
 

I could’ve steamed the­se lob­ster tails which is how I cook my live lob­sters. Some will argue that steam­ing is the only way to go. There are argu­ments for both sides. This info­graph­ic dis­cuss­es both sides as well as a boat­load of oth­er great infor­ma­tion about the four dif­fer­ent ways to cook lob­ster.

cooking_lobster-final-large

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas, the Orig­i­nal Grillin’ Fool, was sent off to col­lege with a suit­case and a grill where he over­cooked, under­cooked and burned every piece of meat he could find. After thou­sands of fail­ures, and quite a few suc­cess­es, near­ly two decades lat­er he start­ed a web­site to show step by step, pic­ture by pic­ture, fool­proof instruc­tions on how to make great things out of doors so that oth­ers don’t have to repeat the mis­takes he’s made on the grill.
Scott Thomas

@GrillinFool

https://t.co/lVWgniik3V#Grill­Porn abounds here. All meat, all the time!
I need all the butcher diss­ing, non brisket smok­ing haters to line up in here and com­ment that this brisket needs …… https://t.co/apEVxJXIWK — 10 hours ago
Scott Thomas

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