Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 11 What are Coun­try Style Ribs and How Do I Grill Them? Excel­lent ques­tions. First off, they are the meati­est of all the pork ribs. They have more meat than all but the fat­test baby back ribs. Sec­ond, there are two types of pork that are sold as coun­try style ribs, although one is not a coun­try style rib. The fake ones are cut from the pork shoul­der:

Fake Pork Country Style Ribs - 1

True coun­try style ribs are cut from the loin either from the rib end or the sir­loin.

Some, not many, butch­ers sell them in slabs like this:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 20

Most sell them cut into fin­gers of deli­cious porcine plun­der like so:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 21

They also come bone­less but I prefer them bone in as the best are the ones with this lit­tle bone:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 18

So what’s the dif­fer­ence? The ones cut from the shoul­der that mas­quer­ade as coun­try style ribs are full of fat and col­la­gen. In order to make them edi­ble, rather than a gum­my wad of pork, they must be cooked to 200 degrees. The true coun­try style ribs need to be grilled like a pork chop and are far health­ier. They also cook much, much faster.

Now that we know what they are and the dif­fer­ence between the two, let’s get down to grilling some bonafide coun­try style ribs.

Ingredients:

Coun­try style ribs
Salt
Pep­per (option­al)
Your favorite rub
Your favorite BBQ Sauce (I used Stubb’s Sticky Sweet)

I real­ize there are no amounts in the ingre­di­ents list here. This is more about the method than a very detailed recipe. And that method is the reverse sear. What that means is we are going to smoke and then sear the meat at the end rather than the oth­er way around. So let’s get going and I’ll explain why this method is so won­der­ful.

Sea­son the coun­try style ribs with salt, pep­per and your favorite BBQ rub. Then pre­pare the grill for two zone grilling also known as indi­rect grilling. What this means is the hot coals go on one side and the meat on the oth­er, with a tar­get temp inside the grill of 300. A cou­ple chunks of smoke wood go on the coals as the coun­try style ribs hit the grill grates on the cool side of the cook­er:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 17

Since the­se are true coun­try style ribs from the loin, they won’t take long to get to about 110 degrees inter­nal temp. You read that right. We have a cou­ple more treat­ments before the­se are per­fect and up to the prop­er temp, so don’t over cook them at this point.

Once they hit 110 degrees, slap them over some hot coals and get a lit­tle char action on the out­side:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 8

If I had seared the meat first, it wouldn’t take on much smoke fla­vor as the out­side skin would be too warm. Once the out­side of the meat gets above about 140, it won’t take any smoke fla­vor. So smoke first, to imbue the meat with that fla­vor and then sear to get the love­ly brown­ing and carameliz­ing of the pro­teins, but don’t sear too long. The­se will be per­fect about 145 degrees inter­nal, so don’t sear them all the way there. We still need to sauce them. For the BBQ sauce, I chose Stubb’s Sticky Sweet:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 16

As a father of 4 small chil­dren, three of whom love BBQ and the 4th is 8 weeks old, I want the best of both worlds. I want that amaz­ing fla­vor with­out the high fruc­tose corn syrup. Stubb’s makes this sauce so deli­cious­ly sweet (and sticky) with­out the HFCS, or any arti­fi­cial ingre­di­ents for that mat­ter, which makes it a main­stay in my pantry.

Now the best part about coun­try style ribs is that the sauce will com­plete­ly envelop each one. How? For­get the grill brush, just grab a pot and some tongs, fill the pot with the sauce and dunk each coun­try style rib in:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 7

Check out this sauce action!

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 5

And just because I got so many great sauce drip­ping shots, here’s one more:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 1

Now place the Stubb’s sauced coun­try style ribs over on the side with no heat and close the lid. I took the time to throw on some ears of corn over the coals to add an easy side to this recipe:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 13

Leave the lid closed, except when you need to rotate the corn, until the inter­nal tem­per­a­ture of the ribs reach­es 145–150, and that sauce thick­ens up and gets extra, extra sticky. It’s already called Stubb’s Sticky Sweet Sauce, remem­ber?!

Time to plate them:

Reverse Seared Country Style Ribs - 9

If you are look­ing for those red and white nap­kins with that clas­sic picnic/BBQ feel like in the pic above, let me help you.

Now we have an answer to our ques­tion. What are coun­try style ribs and how do I grill them? They are the meati­est of all the pork ribs, cut from the loin or sir­loin of the pig. And to grill them prop­er­ly is to reverse sear them and slather with an out­stand­ing sauce so there are lay­ers upon lay­ers upon lay­ers of fla­vor. There’s the rub, then the smoke, then the caramelized pro­teins, then the sauce. Win, win, win, win, and WIN!

If you have any ques­tions or com­ments, feel free to leave them below or send me an email.

Stubb’s BBQ Sauce com­pen­sat­ed me to use their pro­duct in this recipe.

What are Coun­try Style Ribs and How Do I Grill Them?
Author: 
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: BBQ
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Coun­try style ribs are the meati­est of all the pork ribs and come from the loin or sir­loin of the pig. The best way to cook them is to reverse sear them on the grill
Ingre­di­ents
  • Coun­try style ribs
  • Salt
  • Pep­per (option­al)
  • Your favorite rub
  • Your favorite BBQ Sauce (I used Stubb’s Sticky Sweet)
Instruc­tions
  1. Sea­son the coun­try style ribs with salt, pep­per and your favorite rub
  2. Cook them indi­rect on the grill which means coals on one side and the meat on the oth­er
  3. Tar­get tem­per­a­ture inside the grill is 300 degrees
  4. Throw some smoke wood on the coals and close the lid
  5. Once the ribs reach about 110 degrees inter­nal tem­per­a­ture, sear them over the hot side and then dunk them in a pot of sauce
  6. Place them back on the side with no coals to get them to the full 145 degrees they need to get to accord­ing to the FDA and to caramelize and thick­en that sauce
  7. Remove from the grill and serve
 
Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas, the Orig­i­nal Grillin’ Fool, was sent off to col­lege with a suit­case and a grill where he over­cooked, under­cooked and burned every piece of meat he could find. After thou­sands of fail­ures, and quite a few suc­cess­es, near­ly two decades lat­er he start­ed a web­site to show step by step, pic­ture by pic­ture, fool­proof instruc­tions on how to make great things out of doors so that oth­ers don’t have to repeat the mis­takes he’s made on the grill.
Scott Thomas

@GrillinFool

https://t.co/lVWgniik3V#Grill­Porn abounds here. All meat, all the time!
I need all the butcher diss­ing, non brisket smok­ing haters to line up in here and com­ment that this brisket needs …… https://t.co/apEVxJXIWK — 9 hours ago
Scott Thomas

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2 comments

I use stubbs char­coal!! 99% nat­u­ral and 1% veg­gie oil.

Reply

kin­da new to smok­ing. want to try the Okla­homa Joes beans but won’t have smoked brisket to add. I have had the­se beans and they were the best I have ever had. How much dif­fer­ent will they be with out the Brisket?

Reply

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