Grilling a Frozen Steak - 1 Grilling a Frozen Steak? You read that right. I’m not talking about a steak partially thawed and thrown on the grill. I’m talking about a rock solid, frozen steak put directly onto a 500+ degree grill. No, not off to the side to indirect and slow cook until the steak is thawed. I’m talking about throwing that chunk of meat directly onto a melt-your-face hot grill grate. This post is primarily short videos I took for my Instagram account as I felt that pictures wouldn’t do the process justice. That and I figured a whole lot of folks wouldn’t believe me if I only did pictures.

Speaking of my Instagram Account. If you really want to see the crazy stuff I grill on a regular basis (rather than what FB allows through their throttling algorithms) then follow my IG account. I post all kinds of stuff that doesn’t make the website but is still cool to see for any grilling fanatic.

Grilling a Frozen Steak Ingredients:

1 steak, frozen solid
salt
pepper

For this I used one of the Certified Angus Beef NY Strip steaks I received recently in the mail:

Grilling a Frozen Steak - 2

It’s very important that your frozen steak be as flat as possible. The steak will still eat well if it’s not flat, but the grill marks won’t be as good. So let’s get into this. Here is my steak that is seasoned on both sides with nothing more than some coarse Himalayan sea salt and fresh cracked black pepper and placed directly onto my three burner Char-Broil TRU Infrared grill (that grill makes a MEAN steak):

***Pro Tip ~ Always close the lid after putting the steak on, rotating, and flipping to help thaw the steak out as it is searing***

And here is the steak on the grill to prove it’s the same steak:

Here is the frozen steak, after 4-5 minutes of searing and ready to rotate to get those awesome cross hatch grill marks. This is our first peek underneath:

We’ve been grilling a frozen steak and at this point it’s been seared for 4-5 minutes, rotated 90 degrees and seared for another 4-5 minutes. The times here will vary based on the heat of the grill. Just know that if you normally sear for 2-3 minutes before rotating, this will take a couple more minutes per sear session. Here is that frozen steak being flipped over to show the cross hatch grill marks:

And now the frozen steak has been flipped and seared again for 4-5 minutes, rotated and seared for another 4-5 minutes and the now we’re going to take it off the grill to let it rest:

I like a rare steak. Should you want it more done, place the steak on an upper rack or on the side of the grill with no direct heat and close the lid for 4-6 minutes, depending on the size of the steak and heat of the grill, to achieve a medium rare steak. Another 4-6 minutes on the grill, but not over direct heat, and the steak will be medium. Another 4-6 for medium well. You get the idea.

How do you know the doneness of the steak without slicing into it? Simply put, slicing into it before the resting will result in a dry steak, particularly if sliced on the grill. Here’s how to tell a steak is done without slicing into it – the Thumb Test.

I let that steak rest for 2-3 minutes so the juices, in an excited steak from the heat, have a chance to calm down and redistribute throughout the formerly frozen steak. And now I’m going to slice into that glorious piece of Certified Angus Beef:

Here’s a still of the formerly frozen steak sliced:

Grilling a Frozen Steak - 3

And here’s a shot of just one bite:

Grilling a Frozen Steak - 4

Invariably, if you’ve read this far, you’re asking whether aloud or in your head, “But how was it?” I’ll tell you how it was. The meat is cooked more evenly throughout the inside with this process. Did I mention the steak is juicier than a thawed steak. No, the middle is not frozen or cold. It’s not tough or chewy. It’s as tender as any great steak should be. It eats just like a regular steak, but a little better, particularly since I didn’t have to take the time to wait for it to thaw before slapping that frozen steak on the grill. I cook most of my steaks this way now. Give it a try. Everyone who has tells me that it’s a home run, so grab a bat and step up to the plate. Here comes a fat pitch to knock out of the ball park. I showed you exactly how to do it. All you have to do is swing the bat!

As always, if you have any questions, leave them below or send me an email

4.5 from 6 reviews
Grilling a Frozen Steak
Author: 
Recipe type: Steak
Cuisine: Steak
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 1
 
Grilling a Frozen Steak is not crazy talk. It's legitimately easy and delicious and now my go to for the vast majority of my steak grilling.
Ingredients
  • 1 Frozen Steak
  • Salt
  • Pepper
Instructions
  1. Start grill and let it get above 500 degrees
  2. Salt steak
  3. Pepper steak
  4. Place steak on 500+ degree grill and close the lid (close the lid after every step of this process)
  5. After nice, thick grill marks appear, rotate steak 90 degrees which should take 4-5 minutes depending on the heat of the grill (do not flip, just rotate)
  6. Once cross hatch grill marks appear (another 4-5 minutes) flip the steak over and repeat on the other side
  7. Once the steak has cross hatch grill marks on both sides, it's rare and can be served
  8. Should you want it more done, place the steak on an upper rack or on the side of the grill with no direct heat and close the lid for 4-6 minutes, depending on the size of the steak and heat of the grill, to achieve a medium rare steak.
  9. Another 4-6 minutes on the grill, but not over direct heat, and the steak will be medium
  10. Another 4-6 for medium well
  11. You get the idea
  12. Remove from the heat, allow to rest for 2-5 minutes depending on the thickness of the steak and slice
 

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas, the Original Grillin’ Fool, was sent off to college with a suitcase and a grill where he overcooked, undercooked and burned every piece of meat he could find. After thousands of failures, and quite a few successes, nearly two decades later he started a website to show step by step, picture by picture, foolproof instructions on how to make great things out of doors so that others don’t have to repeat the mistakes he’s made on the grill.
Scott Thomas

@GrillinFool

https://t.co/lVWgniik3V - #GrillPorn abounds here. All meat, all the time!
They call it marbling and it's glorious! Pic an beef courtesy @coreythebutcher - What bet… https://t.co/VradJAjwnU https://t.co/QDZmXNqbhQ - 1 hour ago
Scott Thomas

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23 comments

Scott: I remember BBQ’s at your Grandpa Russ’s, seems he was always trying to perfect the cooking of pig snoots. Lots of other great things of course, not just snoots.

Reply

Wayne,

I’m not sure we ever truly perfected those snoots, but man were they good!

…….Scott

Please stop spreading the myth that cutting into a steak will cause it to be dry. This has been de-bunked so many times it’s not even worth including links.

Also, my father’s thumb is tougher than mine which is tougher than my wife’s. Will each of us using the thumb test get identical results?

Reply

Tim,

Uh, no. Sorry, but every chef worth his apron will tell you resting is vital to a juicy steak. Slicing into it before the juices come to a rest will send a great deal of that moisture onto the plate. The first bite won’t be dry, but the last bite will be much dryer than the first…

…….Scott

Scott,
I just grilled a 12 ounce Angus Beef Strip Steak, Bone-In USDA Choice bought from Harris Teeter Grocery Store, sell date was 8/4/2013. Frozen in a home freezer with no additional wrapping and a thumb whole puncture in the store wrapping. Other than the 1 square inch of freezer burn at the puncture spot, the steak was as good or better than any steak I have had at a steakhouse anywhere in the nation, hands down. I flavored it with Montreal Steak seasoning so flavor may have been enhanced over just salt and pepper, but tenderness, cutability, and chewability was like it was a fresh steak purchased yesterday. In fact writing this post makes me hungry of a repeat.

Reply

John,

And nobody believes you, right? Well, I believe you! I know the method works. It’s brilliant really…

…….Scott

I followed your directions to the letter and I had a perfect steak. It was juicy and cooked just the way I like it. I don’t usually freeze steaks, however I was going out of town and threw it in the freezer. The next time steaks are on sale, I’m buying several and will put them in the freezer and follow your instructions. Good job, thanks.

Reply

Bob,

I know it’s crazy, but now I eat more frozen steaks than thawed…

…….Scott

I also cook frozen steak but use a different method.
Before grilling or seasoning I put the steak on a wire rack over a sheet pan in a 250^ oven and slowly bring it up to an internal temp of 100^
Then I season it and finish it on the grill.

Reply

That’s pretty interesting. I’ve never tried it that way… Why not try that in a smoker to infuse with some smoke rather than in the oven?

……Scott

This sounds great! I have never thought of putting something frozen right on the grill. I love your idea of putting a steak in the smoker as well. Can’t wait to try both!

Reply

Meagan,

I cook more frozen steaks than I do thawed ones now…

…….Scott

We bought a drive by steak company box o meat….and the directions were to put on frozen..gooder than grits I tells ya..I do chicken frozen, too…

Reply

Matt,

My dad does frozen chicken all the time too. None of this makes sense to me, but it works!

first frozen steak on the grill! surly not the last. I’ve done frozen in the oven and it was good but even my 9 year old “food critic” agrees this is hands down better.
thank you muchly.

Reply

Mike, glad you enjoyed it. I now cook more frozen steaks than I do thawed steaks…

…….Scott

When you say 500+ do you mean try to keep it around 500? My grill gets up to 700 which is technically (+)

Reply

Kevin,

700 is just fine. The more BTU’s the better!

…….Scott

You do mean rotate 90 degrees, no? Well, you do because you did! 😉

Reply

Peer,

Yep, I did rotate 90. Fixed. Thanks for catching that!

Hello;
I recently discovered this and we love it. It also works on frozen rack of lamb and scallops! The scallops turn out SO tender and delicious with a nice crust.
The only problem I’ve run into is big flare-ups with the steak and lamb. How do you/would you handle that? To get the initial sear, the meat needs to be over the hotter area, correct?
Thank you,
Lora

Reply

Chef Lora,

That’s great info. Thanks.

As for your question. You could put it just to the edge of the hot coals so that the fat drips down just next to the fire…

…….Scott

I BUY STEAKS FRESH & ON SALE; MAYBE 4 TO 8 BONELESS RIB EYE. I ALSO MAKE SURE I HAVE QUART SIZE FREEZER BAGS. I PREPARE A MARINATE USING ITALIAN SALAD DRESSING WITH SALT, PEPPER, GARLIC POWDER MIXED ALL TOGETHER. I DIP EACH STEAK IN MY MARINADE FOR TASTE AND TENDERIZING. I WOULD THE SAME THING FOR ANY MEAT OR FISH. I LET MEAT SIT IN THE REFRIGERATOR FOR A COUPLE OF DAYS ….AND THEN I PUT IT IN THE FREEZER. WHEN IT’S TIME TO PAN FRY OR CHAR BROIL IT I COOK IT JUST AS YOU MENTION. STEAK AT FULL HEAT AND CHICKEN ( LEG QUARTERS ) OFF DIRECT FLAME AFTER INITIAL SEARING. AND LOWER HEAT FOR 1/2 TO 3/4 OF AN HOUR.

Reply

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