Sriracha Ribs - 13

Sriracha Ribs sounds like I’m jump­ing on the Sriracha mania that swept the world via social media a while back. Truth is, I was a huge fan of the roost­er sauce well before there was a so called short­age. I final­ly decid­ed to do a Sriracha post because World Har­bors Mari­nades offered to pay me to do a post using their fine prod­ucts and sent me some bot­tles of their mari­nades, one of which was Sriracha. Since I love Sriracha and I love ribs, I couldn’t pass up com­bin­ing the two and mak­ing some Sriracha Ribs, par­tic­u­lar­ly with Memo­ri­al Day right around the cor­ner. I did them two ways and will show that below. The two dif­fer­ent meth­ods were intend­ed to accom­mo­date those that don’t like the spicy stuff, but it sort of came out back­wards. I’ll explain what that means at the bot­tom when I wrap this one up.

Sriracha Ribs Ingredients:

1 bot­tle, World Har­bors Sriracha Mari­nade, divid­ed

2 slabs, St. Louis style ribs, mem­brane on the bone side removed

1 quart apple juice

1/4 cup salt

3 cloves minced gar­lic

Salt (to sea­son one slab after mar­i­nat­ing)

Your favorite BBQ rub

Sriracha Ribs - 1
Ribs, mari­nade (and a lit­tle salt) is all you need for some GREAT BBQ

Take one slab of skinned ribs and place it in a reseal­able plas­tic bag with about 1/3 of the bot­tle of World Har­bors Sriracha mari­nade. Make sure to coat both sides and work the sauce around inside the bag to cov­er the entire­ty of the slab.

In a sec­ond bag, put the apple juice, gar­lic, and salt. Work the liq­uid around until the salt dis­solves. Then add the sec­ond slab of ribs. Place both bags in the fridge overnight.

The fol­low­ing day, pre­pare the grill for two zone or indi­rect grilling with coals on one side and noth­ing on the oth­er. While the grill comes up to temp, head inside and fin­ish prep­ping the ribs.

For the ribs mar­i­nat­ing in the Sriracha, remove them from the bag, place them meat side down on the cut­ting board and hit the bone side with coarse salt. Flip over and hit the meat side with salt.

Pro Tip ~ Always salt/season/rub the bone side first so when the ribs are flipped over, the nat­u­ral con­cave of the bones will keep the meat off the cut­ting board and thus more of the salt/seasoning/rub will stay on the meat. 

For the ribs in the brine, remove from the liq­uid, pat dry with paper tow­els and apply the BBQ rub bone side first. Wait five min­utes for the rub to com­plete­ly adhere. Flip over and repeat on the meat side.

Once the grill reach­es 275–300, place the ribs on the side of the grill with no coals and put a chunk of smoke wood on the coals. In this case, I used apri­cot wood:

Sriracha Ribs - 2
The mar­i­nat­ed ribs look a lit­tle pale. Don’t wor­ry, that changes FAST!

After 1 hour, the Sriracha Ribs are brown­ing up nice­ly:

Sriracha Ribs - 5
I believe the words I used on Insta­gram were, “Gold­en Brown.” What a mag­i­cal col­or

Pour the remain­der of the bot­tle of World Har­bors Sriracha Marinade/Basting Sauce/Dipping Sauce into a bowl:

Sriracha Ribs - 4
What do you say, you and I go get sauced?

Then baste the ribs with the Sriracha sauce:

Sriracha Ribs - 9
I believe the word ‘Slather’ is appro­pri­ate here

Con­tin­ue to baste the ribs every 20–30 min­utes.

After about two hours, I moved the sauced ribs closer to the fire and the rubbed ribs away:

Sriracha Ribs - 7
Don’t sweat the black stuff. Sug­ars in the rub and the sauce black­en but they are not burnt at all.

The ribs are pret­ty much done about 2.5 — 3 hours depend­ing on the heat of the grill and weight of the ribs:

Sriracha Ribs - 11
Time to yank those ribs and go to town!

How do I know they’re done? The bones are peek­ing out at me. When they stick out between 1/3 to 1/2 an inch, they are done:

Sriracha Ribs - 8
BONES!

Anoth­er indi­ca­tor is the flex of the slab. When they went on raw, you could prac­ti­cal­ly fold them in half. As the fat ren­ders out and the meat tight­ens up, they become more rigid and less bendy. If bendy is not a word, it should be.

Pro Tip part deux ~ Watch the bones instead of the clock when try­ing to fig­ure out when the ribs are done. The bones nev­er lie!

Here’s my rubbed slab that fin­ished before the sauced slab, which some­times hap­pens. This slab is ready for some of the World Har­bors Sriracha dip­ping sauce:

Sriracha Ribs - 13
What a ver­sa­tile sauce. Can be used for mar­i­nat­ing, bast­ing and dip­ping

How did I do?

Sriracha Ribs - 14
Time to dunk

Don’t for­get the oblig­a­tory drip shot when pho­tograph­ing a dip­ping sauce:

Sriracha Ribs - 15
My best drip shot ever!

I was so pleased with the pics from this shoot that I decid­ed to include a few more here that are real­ly not need­ed for the recipe, but hey, if you’ve read this far, you prob­a­bly won’t be at all put out by the­se extra pics:

Sriracha Ribs - 16
Mmm­mm, Smoke Ring!
Sriracha Ribs - 17
Piled High!
Sriracha Ribs - 18
Ready to eat dry or dipped

Now the sauced Sriracha Ribs are done:

Sriracha Ribs - 19
THAT’s a slab!

And sliced:

Sriracha Ribs - 21
The­se had an even bet­ter smoke ring

Let’s not for­get that mag­i­cal elixir known as the World Har­bors Sriracha Mari­nade:

Sriracha Ribs - 22
Sriracha!

I almost for­got the bite shot. If you dig fall off the bone ribs, the­se aren’t them. To do that, foil the ribs at the 2 hour mark for about 90 min­utes and then pull from the foil and throw them back on the grill for 30–60 min­utes. The­se are more com­pe­ti­tion style ribs. Being a cer­ti­fied judge, one of the things to look for is a clean bite that is not pos­si­ble with fall off the bone ribs:

Sriracha Ribs - 25
Nailed it!

But how did they taste? I was quite sur­prised and impressed with the results. I did this test run with the thought that I might have to add some hon­ey or brown sug­ar to the mari­nade to soft­en the heat and add some sweet. I was quite sur­prised in that I didn’t feel the need to doc­tor it at all. That’s sort of again­st my nature. I’m always tweak­ing recipes. The sec­ond thing that sur­prised me was that the sauced ribs were not as spicy as the ribs that were dunked in the sauce. I expect­ed the sauced ribs to inten­si­fy the heat in the Sriracha but in fact, it some how less­ened. The rubbed ribs that were dunked were much hot­ter. The bast­ed ribs were a per­fect bal­ance between sweet and heat. My par­ents, both of whom have lit­tle tol­er­ance for spicy food, ate the sauced ribs. Try some of this sauce for your Memo­ri­al Day cook­out. I bet you will be sur­prised and impressed as well…

Also, check out the Jerk Bacon Wrapped Ribs I did with World Har­bors jerk mari­nade and the Grilled Shrimp Lol­lipops mar­i­nat­ed in the Thai Sweet Chili Sauce plus a bonus Shrimp Cock­tail Shooter at the end of that post.

If you have any ques­tions or com­ments, feel free to leave them below or send me an email.

Sriracha Ribs
Author: 
Recipe type: Ribs
Cuisine: BBQ
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Ribs mar­i­nat­ed in Sriracha, bast­ed in Sriracha and then dipped in Sriracha. An extreme­ly sim­ple recipe for sweet heat spare ribs.
Ingre­di­ents
  • 1 bot­tle, World Har­bors Sriracha Mari­nade, divid­ed
  • 2 slabs, St. Louis style ribs, mem­brane on the bone side removed
  • 1 quart apple juice
  • ¼ cup salt
  • 3 cloves minced gar­lic
  • Salt
  • Your favorite BBQ rub
Instruc­tions
  1. Place one slab of skinned ribs in a reseal­able plas­tic bag with ⅓ of the bot­tle of World Har­bor Sriracha mari­nade, work­ing the mari­nade around to ensure it coats the meat entire­ly
  2. Com­bine the apple juice, salt, and gar­lic in anoth­er bag and mix until the salt is dis­solved
  3. Place the sec­ond slab of ribs in the bag and place both in the fridge for 4–12 hours
  4. Remove the ribs from the bags
  5. For the Sriracha ribs, sim­ply salt the bone side first and then the meat side
  6. For the brined ribs, apply your favorite BBQ rub to the bone side and then the meat side
  7. Pre­pare the grill for two zone grilling with coals on one side and noth­ing on the oth­er
  8. Tar­get tem­per­a­ture inside the grill is 300 +/- 25 degrees
  9. Place the meat, bone side down on the side with no coals and a chunk of smoke wood on the oth­er side (I used Apri­cot)
  10. Pour the remain­der of the Sriracha mari­nade into a bowl
  11. After an hour on the grill, coat the Sriracha ribs with a bast­ing of the mari­nade
  12. Repeat the bast­ing every 20–30 min­utes until the ribs are done
  13. When the bones poke out about ⅓ — ½ inch, the ribs are done (approx­i­mate­ly 2.5 — 3 hours)
  14. Remove from the grill and slice
  15. Serve the dry rubbed ribs with the bowl of the mari­nade that dou­bles as a bast­ing sauce and triples as a dip­ping sauce
 
Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas, the Orig­i­nal Grillin’ Fool, was sent off to col­lege with a suit­case and a grill where he over­cooked, under­cooked and burned every piece of meat he could find. After thou­sands of fail­ures, and quite a few suc­cess­es, near­ly two decades lat­er he start­ed a web­site to show step by step, pic­ture by pic­ture, fool­proof instruc­tions on how to make great things out of doors so that oth­ers don’t have to repeat the mis­takes he’s made on the grill.
Scott Thomas

@GrillinFool

https://t.co/lVWgniik3V#Grill­Porn abounds here. All meat, all the time!
That mahogany col­or is so.…. Wait, what is that gloved hand going to do?!?! Oh, that was… https://t.co/bpqKk30DaO https://t.co/R0MxeAqiys — 1 hour ago
Scott Thomas

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2 comments

[…] Sriracha Ribs sounds like I’m jump­ing on the Sriracha mania that swept the world via social media a while back. Truth is, I was a huge fan of the roost­er sauce well before there was a so called short­age. I final­ly decid­ed to do a Sriracha post because World Har­bors Mari­nades offered to pay me to do a post using their fine prod­ucts and sent me some bot­tles of their mari­nades, one of which was Sriracha. Since I love Sriracha and I love ribs, I couldn’t pass up com­bin­ing the two and mak­ing some Sriracha Ribs, par­tic­u­lar­ly with Memo­ri­al Day right around the cor­ner. I did them two ways and will show that below. The two dif­fer­ent meth­ods were intend­ed to accom­mo­date those that don’t like the spicy stuff, but it sort of came out back­wards. I’ll explain what that means at the bot­tom when I wrap this one up. more… […]

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Great recipe, going to try this soon. Love the site
Thanks

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