Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs - 35 Mustard vs. Mayo Ribs?? I know what you’re thinking. Has Grillin’ Fool Greg lost his mind?  Who puts mustard or mayonnaise on ribs?  This all began when The Grillin’ Fools, all of them, made an appearance on the Pitmasters Radio Network which broadcasts a weekly radio show covering all things BBQ. The show airs every Sunday at 4PM CST on The Big 550 AM KTRS in St. Louis.  A listener asked if we ‘rubbed mustard on our butts!’  After a good laugh I thought about what I actually use mustard on. Brats and dogs were a given and I do use spicy brown mustard as a marinade for beef brisket but that was about all.  I’ve noticed others applying a coat of mustard onto ribs and thought I should test it myself and since I have an affinity for mayonnaise (see Mayo Magic Chicken which has gotten rave reviews), and my son Scott did Mustard Magic Chicken recently, why not do a side-by-side cook and compare.  So that is how we’ve now arrived at the battle between mean mister mustard and mild-mannered mayo.

Mustard vs Mayo

Choosing which type of mustard was an issue.  I opened the cabinet and the fridge and found what you see below.  Ultimately I chose simple plain everyday mustard and the mayo choice was easy. I only had one.

Mustard

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs Ingredients

2 slabs baby back ribs
mustard
mayonnaise (use the light or olive oil version if you wish)
your favorite rub (I used a blend of Code 3 Spices shown below employing 3 tbsp of the Rescue Rub, 2 tbsp of 5-0 Rub, and 1 tbsp Backdraft Rub.)

Code 3 Spices

I tried to modify the heat a bit since my wife was taste testing the recipe.  The Rescue Rub is the mildest with heat progressing to 5-0 and on up to the Backdraft. Did I mention that 50 cents for every bottle sold by Code 3 Spices goes to first responders (police, firefighters, and EMT’s) and military charities? Take a look at the ribs. They look meaty don’t they?

Ribs

Ribs should always be skinned before they go on the grill.  Here’s a brief pictorial on one method.  I used my Jedi mind trick to insert that end of the spoon between the bone and the membrane to make room for my finger.  Next I worked my thumb underneath the membrane to work it loose then pulled upward removing said membrane:

Skinning Ribs

The rascal is slippery and a better grip can be accomplished with a paper towel:

Skin the Ribs

For the prep place both slabs of ribs bone side up on the cutting board.  The ribs will be coated with their respective slather then the rub will be applied then both sides will be flipped over and the process repeated:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Spread a nice even coat:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Don’t forget the sides and ends:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Follow the same procedure for the mayo slab:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Sprinkle a light, even coating of the rub blend onto the bone side of each slab:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Flip the ribs over to address the meat side with the slathers and the rub (go easy with the rub as more will be applied multiple times later):

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Remember to dust the ends:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Wrap each slab tightly with plastic wrap:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Back into the fridge for 4-6 hours or preferably overnight.  By this time I was ready for an ice cold Kräftig Light.

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Set up the grill for indirect cooking. I’m ready to fire up my Grill Dome. I think of it as the Kadillac of kamados.

Grill Dome

Of course with the best grill on the market, I’m going to use the best charcoal. You wouldn’t put cheap gas in a Ferrari. Rockwood Charcoal is simply the best lump charcoal there is using pure Missouri hardwoods. No south of the border junk. Here’s where you can find Rockwood, the only charcoal we use. A coupla’ chunks of cherry and one hickory will add to the flavor profile:

Smoke Wood

For the most extensive list on the internet of smoke woods and what meats they pair best with, click here. When the ribs are removed from the plastic wrap some of the rub will be lost:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Give the ribs another dusting before hitting the grill:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Do you notice how the mustard and mayo seem to have melted into the ribs already? The touched up baby back ribs are on the grill:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

The Grill Dome is holding at 255:

Holding at 250 on the Grill Dome

Anticipated cook time?  3-4 hours at 250 will be the target.  Don’t get hung up on the time or even the temperature of the meat. The bones will tell us when to pull the ribs.  When the meat pulls back from the bones a half inch or so they’ll be done. Here’s a peek one hour in and they’re browning a bit, the mustard and mayo are fading, and another dusting of rub is added:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

2 hours in a bit of bone showing on the end of the ribs where the heat is likely a bit higher around the edge of the grill:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

At the 2 hour 45 minute mark a couple ears of homegrown bi-color corn are added.  A bit more bone showing and surface moisture is more apparent on the mayo slab (foreground):

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

3 ½ hours into the cook and the bones are talkin’!

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Time to pull the ribs and loosely tent with foil to rest. Yes rest yo’ ribs!

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Doesn’t that look good?  Can you tell which one is mustard and which is mayo?

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

Time to carve them and get the taste test underway:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

MmmmmMmmmm. Mustard vs mayo magic baby back ribs separated by fresh local corn with a side of homegrown tomato topped with my own egg salad. This is what makes this time of year so enjoyable:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

And a bonus shot, just because I don’t know which one to use:

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs

What’s the verdict?  Which was better, mustard or mayo?  Both were good however, and there’s always a however in life, the mayo magic ribs get the edge for moistness and a mildness that let the flavor of the meat and seasoning come through plus Mimi liked them best.  Mean Mister Mustard Ribs provided a zestier flavor but were significantly drier than the mayo challenger.  I guess this means that the next rib post might be a combination of the two.  Mustard + Mayo Magic Ribs? If you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave them below or send me an email. Since the mayo magic ribs were better than mustard, the recipe card below will feature the mayo.

Mustard vs Mayo Magic Ribs
Author: 
Recipe type: Ribs
Cuisine: BBQ
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4-6
 
A side by side comparison between mustard and mayo slathered ribs prior to rubbing and grilling.
Ingredients
  • 2 slabs baby back ribs
  • mustard
  • mayonnaise
  • your favorite rub
Instructions
  1. Remove the membrane off the bone side of the baby back ribs
  2. Slather your slabs of ribs with mayo on the bone side
  3. Give a nice coating of the rub
  4. Flip the ribs over and repeat on the meat side
  5. Wrap the mayo magic ribs in plastic wrap and store in the fridge for 4-12 hours
  6. Prepare the grill for two zone or indirect grilling with coals on one side and meat on the other or in a the Kadillac of Kamado's, use a plate setter to deflect the heat away from the ribs
  7. Target temperature inside the grill is 250 degrees
  8. Remove ribs from the fridge and the plastic wrap
  9. Add another coat of rub for what stuck to the plastic wrap
  10. Place a chunk of smoke wood on the coals and the ribs on the grill
  11. Cook time is about 3 hours but let the meat and bones tell you when they are done
  12. When the meat pulls back about a half inch, they are done
  13. Remove the ribs from the heat and allow to rest for a few minutes before slicing and serving
 

3 comments

Didn’t catch that this was Greg posting and was thinking, “I thought Scott had a Cardinal red Grill Dome, what gives?”

Great side by side comparison. I’m a huge fan of Alabama white BBQ sauce but never thought of using mayo as a slather instead of mustard (nice Beatles reference, btw). Cool idea that I’ll have to try out.

Reply

Just saw your website on the charbroil email. In the south US, we enjoy the mustard much more than the mayo. The spicyness versus the bland(?). With the oily mayo, you will get a moister and much milder taste. Not a southern fav at all. I like the idea of a one to five ratio (mayo to mustard) to get a moister meat, but leave the spice alone.

Reply

I’ve never thought of blending the two, Alvin. That’s perfect. Going to try that! Thanks for sharing…

…….Scott

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