Asian Glazed Ribs - 096

Asian Glazed Ribs? Seems more like a summer grilling recipe. Or at least the spring when standing outside for more than 20 minutes does not result in frozen fingers. This is not a recipe for the last three weeks of winter after an ice storm and during a snow fall. Except I’m crazy like that. If it’s snowing, I’m grilling.

I went with a recipe I found on my Google+ Grilling Community page. I want to thank Glen Regan for the recipe. The guy has mad grilling skills. I only modified it a little due to the fact that I didn’t have all the ingredients and had to make due with what I had considering we got about an inch of sleet that day followed by a couple inches of snow. I wasn’t heading out for anything.

Asian Glazed Rib Ingredients:

1 slab of baby back ribs, skinned
Coarse salt
Fresh cracked black pepper
Fresh cracked white pepper
4 oz hoisin
1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp soy
1 tbsp teriyaki
1 tbsp mirin (substitute sake’)
1 tbsp rice vinegar
1 tbsp fish sauce
1 tbsp fresh orange juice
1 tbsp sesame oil
½ tbsp Sriracha
½ tsp ground ginger (substitute fresh ginger if you have it and I would have if the roads were better)
½ tsp Chinese 5 spice
¼ tsp ground mustard

Normally I have a picture of all the ingredients right here. Well, I was doing the Asian glazed ribs solely for my benefit when I remembered I need to practice with my new lens so I decided to take a few shots and the ribs were so good, I had to get them posted here right away. But I didn’t take my first picture until after the sauce was made. In fact, the first picture was after I had made the Asian glaze, skinned the ribs and hit the meat with salt, black and white pepper starting on the bone side first:

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Seasoned Ribs

Why bone side first? Because if the meat side is seasoned first, then when the ribs are flipped over, the seasoning will stick to the cutting board. The curved bones keep the seasoning elevated off the cutting board.

Then combine the rest of the ingredients in a bowl and whisk together into a thin BBQ sauce. Because it is thinner than regular BBQ sauce, this will require multiple glazings. Don’t be afraid that it’s thinner than BBQ sauce, it has a TON of flavor. Trust me.

Now, time to set up the grill. When I say that I got an inch of sleet before I started grilling, I’m not kidding. I left my kamado grill open as a place to set my little portable gas grill and keep it right outside my back door so I could grill some steaks in this wicked frigid winter. Here’s the grill right before I loaded it with charcoal:

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Chilly Grill

I sparked up the best lump charcoal on the market. Rockwood charcoal is available at BBQ specialty shops, independent grocery stores and butcher shops in and around St. Louis.

I set the grill for indirect or two zone grilling. In a standard grill that means coals on one side and meat on the other. In a kamado style grill that means putting a place setter between the hot coals and the meat to deflect the heat away from the ribs. I tossed in some apple wood for the smoking aspect of this recipe.

I prefer high heat smoking when I do ribs. It’s not really high heat as my target temperature for the grill is 300. That’s more like medium heat smoking, but that doesn’t sound as good. I placed the ribs on the grill naked except for some salt and pepper. After an hour the ribs were smoking up nicely:

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Ready for some glaze

Time to hit them with some of the Asian glaze. Make sure to get both sides:

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Glazed once

See, the glaze is not thick and gooey like a standard BBQ sauce, but it will be when I’m done with it. Now flip and glaze every 10 minutes and they will look like this:

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Glazed many times

When the meat of these Asian glazed ribs pulls back from the bone about 1/4 inch the ribs are done and ready to yank from the grill. And while the Asian glaze goes on somewhat thin, when the ribs come off the grill, they look like this:

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How do they look?

Are those ribs gooey enough for you? How about from this angle:

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GOOEY!

If you want, you can reserve a few ounces of the Asian glaze and simmer it down a little and use it as a dipping sauce and drizzle it on the ribs:

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Drizzled

Or you can eat them just as they are when they come off the grill:

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Eat them naked

I tried the ribs both ways, naked and drizzled. Either way the Asian glazed ribs were outstanding. Despite the Siracha, my kids can eat these. If you want more heat, which would complement the sweetness perfectly, kick up the Siracha. If I were making these for just myself, I would probably go with triple the Siracha, but I’m a heat junkie. Kick it up at your own risk.

Here are more grilled baby back ribs with an Asian twist which were done with an Asian rub, but these grilled Asian ribs have a thai peanut sauce.

Asian Glazed Ribs
Author: 
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: BBQ
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 3-4
 
Baby Back Ribs, smoked and then slathered in an Asian glaze.
Ingredients
  • 1 slab of baby back ribs, skinned
  • Coarse salt
  • Fresh cracked black pepper
  • Fresh cracked white pepper
  • 4 oz hoisin
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp soy
  • 1 tbsp teriyaki
  • 1 tbsp mirin (substitute sake')
  • 1 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp fresh orange juice
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • ½ tbsp Sriracha
  • ½ tsp ground ginger (substitute fresh ginger if you have it)
  • ½ tsp Chinese 5 spice
  • ¼ tsp ground mustard
Instructions
  1. Skin the ribs and then coat each side with the salt and pepper (bone side first)
  2. Then combine the rest of the ingredients in a bowl and give a good whisk (reserving some to simmer if you want to drizzle on at the end)
  3. Prepare the grill for two zone/indirect grilling with coals on one side and the meat on the other or put a place setter between the meat and the heat
  4. The target temperature of the grill is 300
  5. Throw in some smoke wood (I used apple) and place the meat on the grill
  6. After 60 minutes of smoking, slather with the sauce on both sides
  7. Glaze on both sides every 10 minutes until the meat pulls back from the bone ¼ inch (about 2 hours depending on the heat of the grill)
  8. Remove from the grill and either eat as is or drizzle with the simmered sauce
 

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas, the Original Grillin’ Fool, was sent off to college with a suitcase and a grill where he overcooked, undercooked and burned every piece of meat he could find. After thousands of failures, and quite a few successes, nearly two decades later he started a website to show step by step, picture by picture, foolproof instructions on how to make great things out of doors so that others don’t have to repeat the mistakes he’s made on the grill.
Scott Thomas

@GrillinFool

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